Archive | April, 2012

Weekly Round Up

30 Apr

Topics, links and comments from this week’s HBP discussions.

Jan's favorite fish.

Avocado oil may improve blood lipids.

The liver tells all and reveals much about fat.

How many calories to you burn using a standing desk? 

A Paleo food truck is in the works. Show your support people!

Russ's pho!

Fatty food’s link to marital stress?  Of course we’ve seen just the opposite here. 

A nice submission to the NY Times’ Ethical Meat Eating contest.

Helminths for allergic rhinitis.

Screwing up the environment is Paleo. Or at least we’ve been doing it for a very long time. 

Another rebuttal to the latest anti-meat arguments.

Interesting connection between niacin and obesity.  Paul Jaminet adds to the discussion here. 

Derrick's hardcore stew of beef bones, beef heart, assorted shellfish, bone stock and other thangs.

Men’s grooming products can be pretty uncomfortable. 

Fasting’s beneficial effects on cancer treatment.

Round 2 of HBP -Cook-off closes Friday, May 4th. The rules are as follows:  Protein: ground meat (does not have to be beef) 3 veggies: three different colors, starch is up to you if you choose to do one or not – also totally open, rice, potato – safe starches! 3 Spices only. More here.

Results of Biggest Loser regimen on participants’ metabolisms.

How vegetable oils replaced animal fats.

Julia's San Diego trip featured some tasty food.

The mental effects of supplementing with DHA alone.

Chocolate has many special benefits– science says so!

 Chris Kresser continues with his salt series. 

Get your Gluten Free Coconut Cake recipe here!

Mash's Saturday night spread.

Weekly Round Up

23 Apr

Here’s a recap of links and photos from the HBP discussion group. (Note: Meredith is fully aware that “Roundup” can be used as one word but separated it into two the first time she used it on this blog. Therefore she is stubbornly sticking to this incorrect version. Suck it if you don’t like it!).

Dennis has some nice purple kraut going!

Thanks to Pat (@nutritionator) Highbrow Paleo has a newspaper based on some #Paleo tweets. It’s a neato idea and you, YES YOU can subscribe if you’d like.

Supplement with red meat for your health.

Paleo Republic has nearly all your Paleo food ideas covered (except for thedomesticman.com). Check out this meatza.

It’s been badmouthed for years, but caffeine is making a comeback. So many interesting uses – treating dry eyes for example.

Some members are tackling this list of 45 foods to never buy again but dreaming up Paleo versions.

Light pollution is now considered as carcinogenic as smoking.

Julia's egg salad, Bubbies pickle, some local bacon & U.S. Wellness liverwurst

Superhuman Radio interviews Loren Cordain.

Should kids go vegan? 

Who else out there is having this issue? Lately our bulk turmeric is VERY dark. And this is from those of us who live on totally different sides of the US. Some think it's a soil PH think other attribute it to copper. Anyone else seeing this?

J. Stanton gives us something more to think about in terms of food reward.

Ancestral Momentum tackles the controversial (who knew??) subject of cold thermogenesis. 

Need a cookbook devoted to insect recipes?

Our buddy Tony was on Low Carb Conversations, a Jimmy Moore podcast.

The diet world is getting weird, or weirder.

Cholesterol just may be the thing to help us fight cancer.  

People who eat a lot of flavanoids, particularly blueberries, have lower rates of diabetes and mortality and they raise adiponectin levels. Hear more here.

Aspirin increases AMPK.

What’s crazier: eating plants and animals (aka “paleo”) or eating beaver anal gland secretions?

Russ's lettuce chips.

Another variable to add to the pointless chase for eternal life we are all compelled to partake in.

Why are Asian rice eaters thin? 

Shift work and diabetes.

Hunger and it’s ability to help partition your calories where they need to go – away from fat and into lean tissue.

Stabby’s Corner (direct quotes from the Raccoon itself in response to this article about science failing us):

 “The scientific method is great, it is just that when there’s lots of money involved it kind of disappears out the window. Clinical trials are great and teach us a lot, and people just need to have a view of the context of things. There are too many myopic specialists and not enough generalists to put the whole picture together.

I think that a bunch of passionate people who can read and think without bias, like Highbrow Paleo, yay, is the best way to use science to get to the truth of the matter. Couldn’t we slash cardiovascular risks using science if we came up with recommendations? I’d like to hope so.

Most epidemiology should just restract itself and go home. Give the money to people who are going to do clinical trials that are smartly conducted and based in evidence.”

Carly's wild smoked salmon fillet with ginger, garlic, lime, gf soy sauce and chilli flakes, kale pan fried in butter and rice with butter. 🙂

Weekly Round Up

16 Apr

We got all discussy this past week. Here are some links and food photos to whet your appetites!

Jan's Finnish whitefish caviar with shitakes.

Higher levels of PCBs in organic milk when compared to conventional milk.

Underground Wellness featured Dr. Tery Wahls.

Shift work and it’s effects on diabetes risk. 

Coffee’s effects on adipokines, liver function, triglycerides and LDL.

Connection between blood levels of some of the phthalates and increased prevalence of diabetes, even after adjusting for obesity, blood lipids, smoking, and exercise habits.

Vitacost promotes “eating like a caveman” in their latest newsletter!

Jan wins "Mr. Paleo 2012".

Chris Kresser tackles salt in his latest series of blog posts.

Riiiiight. The obesity epidemic is a simple math problem!

Mel HGL serves up a post that covers the traditional use of cold therapy.

Perhaps the best weight loss article ever written?

Humans apparently evolved the ability to produce omega 3 and 6 fats to feed our brainz. But in today’s world this may serve as a mismatch and is prolly royally screwing us up!

Chronic dieting isn’t doing very much good for our waste lines.

Russ's colcannon with just a smidge too many leeks - but he thinks onions are gross anyway.

Paindatabase.com urges us to stop all the negative thinking!

Fecal transplants may sound downright horrid, but if you’ve got a case of C. diff you just may want to seek out a healthy poo donor.

The BBC covers the revival of fermenting foods.

Jarred baby food is pretty devoid of nutrients. 

Honey’s effect on human evolution.

FED features a comprehensive post about the merits of cooking in human evolution.  

Notes from Andrew,  our resident Bastyr Doctor of Naturopathic medicine student:

  •  Chamomile (matricaria recuita) is kind of amazing. It’s the most potent herbal nervine known. It contains matricine which get converted in the gut to chamazulene. Chamazulene powerfully stops the conversation of arachidonic acid (a major source of oxidation) and inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 (think low, low dose aspirin). Chamomile alo contains apigenin which reduces DNA oxidation, is chemoprotective, and induces apoptosis. Squiterpense give chamomile it’s bitter taste which stimulate cranial nerve 9 and 10 causing an increasing in stomach acid, salivation, and peristalsis. Many of these benefits are in the volatile oils of chamomile so teas must be covered as they steep otherwise the volatile oils will evaporate. If your chamomile isn’t slightly bitter, find a brand that hasn’t bred the medicinal qualities out of their chamomile.
  • Also, how to make the computer less addicting at night. control + option + command + 8 Try it out.

Jenny decided that Saturday nights are perfect for boning.

Weekly Round Up

8 Apr

What kind of krazy krap do we talk about in the HBP discussion group you ask? Here you go. You asked for it!

Amanda's amazing pork loin with spicy cranberry for $2.50 a serving!

Some beautiful food art for sale.

We all KNOW it’s an important topic, so here’s another piece about how maternal diet affects the health of babies.

Lustig was on 60 Minutes this week, and Alan Aragon responds!

Can mummies reveal the secrets to cure obesity?

Curious about what varying body fat levels actually look like? You may be surprised about what you find most attractive.

For the lacto-Paleos. Greek yogurt, strawberries.raspberries.blueberries., a bit o maple syrup.

Girls are cool and strong!

Researchers identify distinct metabolic responses to high & low GI carbohydrates in healthy, non-obese individual.

Superhuman Radio was a biggie for us this week with two Paleo interviews. Paul Jaminet gives another great interview and so does Robb Wolf .

Carly's cottage pie.

Is the U.S. obesity epidemic even greater than reported?

Julia's scallops!

Here’s a new and interesting egg recipe by The Domestic Man!

Saccharomyces boulardii is a beneficial strain of yeast, a probiotic, that appears to be medicinal.

An enzyme in saliva helps regulate blood glucose.

Amanda's crab cakes (ever need some Paleo catering? HBP cooks are amazing!)

“A secret of our industrial food system is that it pumps chickens with arsenic, caffeine, Benadryl and Tylenol — even illegal antibiotics.”

Robb Wolf has a great, tear jerking post on his blog.

Japan’s new love affair with wheat. 

J. Stanton posts a good read about nutritionism. 

Jan's Finnish herrings.

Monsanto threatens to sue Vermont?

Evidence that humans used fire 1 million years ago. 

Taurine is good. It prevents heart disease (in amounts you would get in your diet and not super dosing with pillz). A possible mechanism is that taurine inhibits non-enzymatic glycation and lipid peroxidation. 

Melissa McEwan’s part deux of her evolutionary biology series. 

Jan's Oxtail.

Antibiotics effect gut flora which screw up your vitamin producing bacteria, and more in this post by Dr. Ayers. 

Denise Minger’s adds a section to her blog just for vegans. Very helpful and interesting.

Interesting paper on the effects of saturated fats vs n-6 PUFA on liver fat. 

FED takes on Self Determination Theory.

Does Yerba Mate fix your funky leptin?

Fire Adaptation: Activate Your Ancient Pathway for Optimal Health!

7 Apr

“Like a moth to the flame, burned by the fire. My love is strong…can’t you see my desire?”  –Janet Jackson, “All 4 U”, April 21st, 2001

Why is fire so important?

Hi, I’m Kamal, from paindatabase.com. For as long as I can remember (meaning this morning…it was a rough night last night), I’ve been obsessed with fire. Last week, I was excited to see that researchers have found evidence of humans using fire one million years ago. So don’t TELL me we’re not adapted to fire. Nuh-uh. I will burn you.

So that’s the con of fire: it can burn you. The pros? Let’s do a “Being John Malkovitch” and enter the mind of an early caveman using fire. We’ll call this specimen “Brendan Fraser” for ease of discussion, or Fraser for short. There likely weren’t quite as many websites around back then, so Fraser would be really into obtaining food and having sex, but not always in that order. A popular viewpoint among researchers is that Fraser would have been able to eat more delicious, grilled meat and tubers than he would raw foods, leading to all kinds of changes with brain size and other physiological characteristics. At night, Brendan would be sitting around a campfire under the stars with his lovely, natural, hairy-legged better half. What next? Sex. I hypothesize that there would be even MORE sex than before fire. Spoon when it’s cold, copulate when it’s warm. That’s my motto.

Okay, let’s get serious. What are the physiological benefits of heat? 

Let’s talk heat shock proteins. First, let me admit that all I know about heat shock proteins is what I could gather from half an hour of research. Next, let me tell you that they are quite interesting: when cells are exposed to elevated heat or certain other stressors, heat shock proteins do all kinds of cool shit. Like regulate tumor response, prevent cell death from excess stress, and influence aging through hormesis. Is this important for humans in warm vs cold climates? Ehhh…as you can imagine, our internal temperatures are quite well regulated, although environment/diet/hormones etc do play a role in core temperature. And you can influence heat shock proteins through other things such as exercise and fasting. But all this is pretty interesting nonetheless.

Infrared saunas to the rescue?

A regular sauna heats your body by circulating warm air. An infrared sauna transfers heat more or less directly to your body using special lamps or bulbs. It’s like the sun, but in a smaller, closer package that doesn’t provide you with vitamin D. Did you know that there is actually a decent amount of evidence supporting the use of these heaters for chronic fatigue, chronic pain, high blood pressure, and some other stuff? It’s actually quite a good adjunct treatment for dialysis patients, to boot. The mechanisms are up for debate. Sweating out toxins? Maybe. Increasing core body temperature? I dunno. But yet again, something to think about.

Core body temperature, lifespan, and everything else

So now that I’ve convinced you of nothing, but maybe given you something to chew on, let me wrap this up with a couple more thoughts about heat and humans. Will living in a warm climate, let’s say Hawaii, make you live longer or kill you a few years earlier? If hypothetical effects of ambient temperature on lifespan are a driving force in your life, well, that sucks for you! Hawaii is awesome, and I’m 82% certain that living in a balmy climate would extend my life through not having to deal with cold weather (but to each his own, as always).

Creating mutant mice that have much lower core temperatures leads to a 20% longer life. Great! But I try not to base my life on studies of mutant lab mice. I found a bunch of weird studies supporting the opposite argument, like this one hypothesizing that babies gestating in warm years suffer health consequences when living in cold climates. But really, study-battles can only get you so far. It doesn’t take a formal study to show that people generally like warm temperatures. Brendan Fraser certainly tried to avoid the cold, by huddling near the fire, using blankets, and having hot hot sex. And you can live to 121 years of age living in the sweltering Amazon, eating bananas, grilled meat, and tubers.

So while the historical roots of the human genome are fascinating, I personally strive for happiness over hacking influenced by potentially erroneous hypothesizing. Sure, the Earth’s temperature has fluctuated wildly up and down in the past few million years. But just because it was sweltering hot when mammals began to diversify, doesn’t mean I’m going to wear an infrared sauna suit three hours a week. And while I’d use cold baths if I get neurotic about burning a few more calories, or as an adjunct experiment for difficult-to-treat conditions, I’m not going to do four hour ice baths to get in touch with my single-celled ancestor from two billion years ago. Keeping things hormetically fresh by changing up the temperature…fine. But I get a pass on this one, because of my Indian ancestry. My predecessors haven’t seen snow in (???) thousand years. So to emulate my ancestors from Gujarat, India, all I have to do is keep the thermostat between 75 and 101 degrees. (!) Now it’s time for me to resume dreaming about living on the beach. Until next time…stay thirsty, my friends.

Word Vomit – Episode 1

5 Apr

I’m Pat from nutritionator.com. I suck at blogging.

I need to write more often. It’s the only way I’m ever going to get better at it and reading as many blog posts, articles, journals, updates and tweets as I do these days, I need to up my game.

Of course I googled “how to be better writer”. I google everything. One of the suggestions was to just sit down and write whatever comes to mind. Deal.

Word vomit is a very fitting title for what this post is probably going to end up resulting as…

There is some drama going down in the paleo community.

And it needs to stop for things to move forward.

The Jack Kruses and Richard Nikoleys (intentionally lacking links since enough people find their way to these guys anyway) of the paleo world just need to be ignored because they are lost causes at this point. Every movement has its crazies and these are just two of them that have unfortunately had their names branded along side the paleo, whole-food, back to nature, mindfulness movement that has been helping so many people get healthy. Why some people have to go at it from such an ass backward direction I will never know but I think all that time and energy should be put to better use. I honestly am not smart enough to comment on what these guys are talking about most of the time but thankfully I have friends that are. But I do know that lying about massaging yourself with MRSA before surgery or calling women the C word are things that I’m doing my best to avoid on my journey through life and I think everyone else on the planet could benefit from avoiding those things also.

There’s just no reason for such outlandish claims and extreme behavior and we’ll have a much easier time selling people on whole food and proper exercise if we don’t approach it so radically. Yeah it’s cool to be popular, and maybe that’s what the Paleo Jersey Shore folks are going for. Do and say whatever it takes to get more fans, more devotees, more $$$? It’s sure starting to look that way with how some people behave.

I do my best to avoid needless drama and I think I might be fighting a losing battle. Is this just human nature? People eat drama up, they love it. Teen Mom and any other show on MTV feed this craving and all these shows are about is people that have messed up their lives. And millions of people watch for ENJOYMENT! There’s something seriously wrong with the human condition if that many people enjoy watching men degrade women and women degrade each other i.e. Jersey Shore and any Real Housewives show.

Drama sells and I think some people are just smart and soul-less enough to make a profit off it. I guarantee Nikoley’s most recent post is one of, if not the most popular post he’s ever done and it’s because of the religious talk, name calling, accusations and flippant use of curse words in the comments section.

That post is Jerry Springer. Somewhat staged starring a bunch of trash people while a few Jerry’s try to talk people into slowing down and actually think about this stuff before they come out swinging. Too few Jerry’s and too much trash make for an entertaining show but it’s not going to make anyone any smarter for watching. Time to turn the channel back to that documentary you were watching or better yet, get off the couch and go outside. The drama doesn’t stop if you stop watching, it just has one less person feeding into the viewership, and this is a very good thing.

Remember what you do to really get on someone’s nerves or show someone they’re being ridiculous? You ignore them, and that’s what we need to do here. Ignore the crazies. Take them off your blogrolls, friends lists, twitter feeds, email lists and contacts and just ignore them. That’s all we can do.

It’s scary. SO much time and energy is wasted by and on people that are just out to make a buck or see their name in headlines and will do whatever it takes to do so. WHY can’t we focus this energy on ACTUALLY helping people instead of knocking what the general public thinks of a whole food, ancestral lifestyle back down a step or two so often?

I guess I’m just asking people to really evaluate what people are saying. Mark SissonRobb WolfChris KesserPaul Jaminet and so many other super knowledgable people have free resources available and don’t curse at women or require 6 hour ice baths. Read and promote these people, not the drama generators.

This is just my plea to decrease the crazy. We already have to deal with governments run by grains, doctors funded by pharmaceuticals and unimaginable things like raw, pastured dairy being illegal. Let’s put our energy into remedying those problems, not the he said, she said BS that keeps popping up the paleosphere.

I’m going to do my best to avoid, ignore and disprove the crazies and I think you should too.

Now, someone that actually knows how to write needs to put something up so this isn’t HBP’s featured post for too long…

Weekly Round Up

2 Apr

A weeks worth of links and info from the “pool of idiots” (we’re really very nice but very human people thank you very much).

Matthew's motto should be "Always Sit Down to a Pretty Plate." Nice work here!

Kids like to get dirty, and it looks like they NEED to get dirty for good health.

This taco shell idea just may be the worst, or best thing ever?

April is Best Your Stress Month – so try some of this for free. 

H. Pylori, ulcers and diabetes.

Julia's lamb burger with feta and zucchini.

Whey protein may not be on the top of many “Paleo” shopping lists, but we discussed the many benefits of both whey and casein in the context of a healthy highly active person’s diet. Also, dairy in and of itself probably won’t “make you fat.”  

Can Talk Therapy benefit Chronic Pain? 

Cooking with Olive Oil doesn’t HAVE to be totally off the table.

Don’t totally freak out…but there are some demonstrated benefits to ingesting your encapsulated placenta.

Beef and green veggies to treat subclinical hypothyroidism.

BPA accumulation in fat is another underlying factor to obesity – when will we just make it illegal already!   Oh wait…the FDA rejected that petition.

Correlation between chocolate consumption and lower BMI (correlation does not equal causation…who cares! Pass the fudge!)

Matthew eats da foodz.

First of a series of how to implement your own workout routine based on your personal goals. Follow the series, its worth it!

Paleo women + body image +fear of judginess = excellent rant.

Speaking of excellent rants, who does it better than Mistress Stumptuous?

This is a VERY odd exercise phenomenon.

Our very own Russ gets picked up by Free the Animal with this guest post.

Getting in tune with out biological clock can be as effective as pharmaceutical avenues.

Buttah!

Raw milk will make you super human! Okay, maybe not, but it does awesome stuff for you glutathione production.

Melissa McEwan’s first in a series on Evolutionary Biology, complete with informative comments from industry experts.

The Honey Guide blog has a menu of John Hawkes lectures posted. Soooo interesting. Don’t miss the one on enamel!

A new FREE paleo links and resources site dedicated to all things free. Submit your free resources today!

Beef and bison stew with a big 'ol marrow bone by Julia.